Tuesday, 11 July 2017

Modelling

This is my reply on a LinkedIn group in response to a question about modelling criminals in order to find better solutions to imprisonment.  I thought it worth sharing here:

To add to this, I too often wonder about all this supposed modelling. I don't wish to dismiss the original question in this thread as I think it has worth, but I have to ask where are all the models and demonstrations of the excellence that is so frequently claimed in NLP?

For example:

- Did an NLPer ever win the target shooting at the Olympics?
- Do we have legions of NLPers making money on the stock exchange, in property investment?
- Do we have NLPers offering lessons in healing on hospital wards?
- Any NLPers competing and winning at Nascar?
- Any NLPers inventing new machines and technology?
- Any champion fighters, boxers or gamblers who got there from NLP modelling?
- Any medical breakthroughs from NLP modelling?

There may be one or two, but I doubt there are very many despite there being many, many thousands of people trained in NLP and claiming qualification.

I think in part it goes wrong because to do any of these things involves a great amount of work, and many NLPers don't want to do "work" - what they want to do is NLP!

There are undoubtedly a very great number of dedicated people who work in the criminal justice system who well understand the model of criminality from a multiple of aspects. I doubt such understanding comes through chatting to a few crims though. Hard work, dedication and being in it for the long haul will probably help a lot.

One of the problems in-built into the world of NLP is that so many people are attracted to NLP for selfish purposes i.e. personal development and recreation. It's fun, it fulfils, it's a good thing to do. However, many jobs such as medicine/nursing, criminal justice, military and so on require something else - the ability to deal with really shitty times and bad days at the office, physical and mental exhaustion, physical and mental threats and challenges and so on. These are usually the very things that the NLPer and coach seeks to avoid - it is one of the reasons that so many self-employed seek self employment - to avoid the pain of work.

It is just unfortunate that so many end up avoiding not just the pain, but they also avoid the work itself.

And then the follow up...

"I wonder why there is such an apparent lack of modelling evidence and it 
being put into practice; is it because NLP is still seen as a black art by 
mainstream medicine, business and society, or is it still a well-kept 
(deliberately perhaps?) secret?"

Not at all. It is not up to the medics, business people or society to find the application of NLP, it is the responsibility of the NLP practitioners who claim excellence to do so.

I think that it is the problem. Selfish and smug, see...

For years, working at Southampton General Hospital, before my cynicism to NLPers set in I regularly invited NLP practitioners to come and do modelling work and also to demonstrate their excellence on the departments on which I worked. No one ever took me up on this.

For NLPers wanting to get rich and famous for being "excellent" - what better way than modelling healing and then demonstrating it on a simple video posted onto youtube?

Same for those guys who claim to be able to teach you to read minds like Derren Brown - let's see a video then? Guys? Guys...? Oh, never mind.

How about seeing your submodality sets via SMEACS? A video demonstration, perhaps? Not too difficult for NLPers of apparent seniority, surely? Yet when asked publicly, said persons have what appears to be an emotional meltdown before one can utter the magic words, "State control! State control!"

Building a control panel in your mind, creating binocular telescopic vision? Enhance your hearing and sensory acuity? Fine, just be sure when writing to the guy that you use large print and double line spacing. But how about a video demonstrating the effect of said machines? Just a little video..something..anything?

Having a person sitting on your knee, regressed to being a small child and able to see the book that mother is reading with absolute clarity? Cute story, but how about a demo of such things?

Modelling sharp shooters for the army? Let's see the video. Shouldn't be too difficult to take an inexperienced person to the gun range and then film the installation and delivery of sharp shooting excellence. So, where's the video? I'm a member of a couple of gun clubs that are local to me. Come on over, I'll do the filming and am willing to be a demo subject (I'm a dreadful shot) just remember to bring some cake and wear Kevlar.

What about a mediocre video of some therapeutic excellence? Oh, that isn't too common either. Me and Nick Kemp are two of a very small number of people willing and able to demonstrate this and we continue to do so. Why isn't everyone else doing this? Perhaps because they are afraid of being "found out"?

But what we do get is yet more and more and more and more and more claims of marketing wizardry and brilliance (mostly from people heavily in debt), firewalking and yet more bored (sic) breaking. Same old, same old.

Yet, often I hear how "closed" the medical world is. Yet, this is completely contrary to my experience.

I often hear NLPers being highly negative of doctors ("Can you believe it, he actually said to the patient, 'this might hurt' - can you imagine!!") but yet I don't see too many NLPers popping off to gain their medical degree so they can apply their amazing skill base in the real world (as opposed to applying it in their imagination).

When people ask, "why don't doctors learn NLP?" I generally reply, "Why don't NLPers learn medicine?"

The complaint of "doctors are closed to the idea of NLP" is hardly grounded in reality, yet I hear it referenced often. It's a convenient excuse, of course. It means that their miracles of NLP are never actually tested, and so it keeps the dream alive.

Next time you hear an NLPer say this, ask them how many medical clinics they have actually asked to visit and demonstrate their excellence.

My best guess as to why so few people ever are wiling to find an application of their NLP skills is simply because reality has this habit of really ruining a good dream. An expensive dream at that.

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